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IMO Newsletter “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Facts vs Fiction” Seminars wrap-up (with resources)

 Introduction
This IMO Newsletter article provides an update on the recent seminars on “Chronic Fatigue: Fact vs. Fiction” held in Sydney and Melbourne. The intention is that this post-seminar report will be a useful resource and act as a primer for further education of our clients and clinicians in this topic area.

As we stated in the invitation emails for these Sydney and Melbourne seminars we believe that CFS is hard to diagnose and manage clinically, presents many challenges for an IME, and is hard to prosecute/defend for a legal case.
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IMO Newsletter “Pain & Feigning” Seminars wrap-up (with resources)

Introduction
This IMO Newsletter article provides an update on the recent seminars on “Pain & Feigning” held in Sydney and Melbourne. The intention is that this post-seminar report will be a useful resource and act as a primer for further education of our clients and clinicians in this topic area, relevant to your particular cases/clients.

The content includes links to the seminars’ PowerPoint presentation and a document of references used in preparation of the seminars with bibliography resource material which I believe should be a useful resource (5 pages) for clients, including Case Managers, Lawyers, Injury Management Advisors and IME medico-legal consultants. It may also be downloaded as an IMO Pty Ltd copyright document for private study and/or organisation-wide information libraries.

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Testamentary capacity & competence assessment: questions of relevance given increasing ageing and dementia in Australia

Introduction
This is a short article extracting some key content from an article pre-publication (hopefully in an eminent peer-reviewed journal) by Jane Lonie. The intention is that this article will be a primer for further reading in this area as relevant to your particular cases/clients.

Background
Capacity is:
• the ability to make and communicate a decision;
• not a unitary or global concept;
• domain specific: particular to the type of decision being made (e.g. personal, health, financial); and
• decision or task specific: different for every decision made, even within one domain.[1]